Binary Options Xposed - Home

[Suggestion] Android 10 aternative method for rooted users ( does not break safetynet)

Use the Smalipatcher for magisk, its working on Android 10
Download the program here (need java) on your pchttps://forum.xda-developers.com/apps/magisk/module-smali-patcher-0-7-t3680053
  1. Backup device.. safety first kids.
  2. Enable USB debugging in developer settings on your device and connect via USB to your PC.
  3. Authorise USB debugging connection on your phone.. example of popup.
  4. Run "SmaliPatcher.exe", First startup will automatically download the latest necessary binary's.
  5. Select your desired patches ( Signature verification - Disable signature verification allowing modification/execution of signed system apps. for youtube vanced)
  6. Hit "ADB PATCH" button
  7. Once the process has completed, magisk module will be generated in the same directory as "SmaliPatcher.exe" named: "[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])".
  8. Install the generated magisk module from the magisk manager.
  9. Enable smali patcher module in magisk.
  10. install SAI on your android
  11. Install last rooted version from vanced.app via SAI
  12. Enjoy

No need to install xposed or chinese patcher, just works, no matter how hard i tryed.. xposed allways messed up my safetynet, this way works no problems.
I hope it help everyone.. stay safe guys.
submitted by DuduMaroja to Vanced [link] [comments]

Trying to unlock and use my old Nexus 5 (root)

So switched to IOS years ago but am in need of a work phone reviving a Nexus 5 that seemingly survived and should fit the bill. The issue is I can't remember my pattern lock, and its rooted on some version of android I can't remember.
I would guess its CyanogenMod or something as "Stock" android as possible.
My options are swipe up to unlock-which trying leads to locked out for 30 seconds after every 5 attempts.
I can ermegancy call or access the camera but that is it.
Plugging it into my PC it appears drivers are up to date, yet the only place my device shows up is DeviceManager>AndroidDevices>Android ADB Interface

On my Home screen I have A few Notifications
SuperSU-The SU Binary needds to be updated
Xprivacy-Xprivacy is not installed in the Xposed...

Been Awhile since I've Messed with this stuff stopped Phone Mods with Iphone a little rusty now.
submitted by BiggestJoeROL to AndroidQuestions [link] [comments]

OnePlus 3/3T Suggested Oreo ROMs and Mods Thread

The last post about this has Nougat info, so I thought I should post this. Note: I won't include every Oreo ROM or kernel, only the ones that are updated regularly, or at least includes the recent patches. There's an XDA thread, but I know some people prefer Reddit.
 
Drivers, ADB, and Fastboot
Optional (update or use these adb and fastboot binaries instead of the ones above): https://developer.android.com/studio/releases/platform-tools.html
 
Recovery: TeamWin Recovery Project (TWRP) - https://twrp.me/oneplus/oneplusthree.html - the image is unified and works with the 3 and the 3T.
 

Firmware + Modem (If you'll be flashing Oxygen OS, these aren't needed. Make sure you download the proper firmware for your device!):

OnePlus 3

OnePlus 3T

 

ROMs:

Stock (flash the proper zips for your device as they are not unified unlike custom ROMs!)

Custom/AOSP/LOS-based (unified for both the 3 and the 3T)

http://dwnld.aicp-rom.com/?device=oneplus3
http://xfer.aokp.co/?developer=AOKP&folder=oneplus3
https://get.aosiprom.com/oneplus3/
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=259680&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=258189&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=235075&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
http://get.carbonrom.org/device-oneplus3.html
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=256882&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://download.dirtyunicorns.com/?dir=oneplus3
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=217699&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://download.lineageos.org/oneplus3
https://download.lineage.microg.org/oneplus3/
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=260198&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://download.mokeedev.com/?device=oneplus3
https://sourceforge.net/projects/nitrogen-project/files/oneplus3/oneplus3_test/8.1/
http://dl.omnirom.org/oneplus3/
http://downloads.resurrectionremix.com/oneplus3/
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=246534&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
http://luis-builds.de/downloads/lineageos/roneplus3/
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=256927&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=239521&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
 

Kernels:

OxygenOS

https://forum.xda-developers.com/devdb/project/?id=15934#downloads
https://www.boeffla.de/index.php/downloads/current-kernel-versions
https://downloads.akhilnarang.me/kernel/oneplus3/Stable
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=232458&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=256253&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=213131&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=233922&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC

Custom/AOSP/LOS-based

https://github.com/MSF-Jarvis/oneplus3/releases
http://elementalx.org/kernels/OP3T/8.1.0/CAF/
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=249668&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
https://sourceforge.net/projects/kernelxtended.xtended.p/files/oneplus3/
https://androidfilehost.com/?w=files&flid=253747&sort_by=date&sort_dir=DESC
 

Google Apps:

 

Mods:

submitted by VincentJoshuaET to oneplus [link] [comments]

I may have found a work-around for the Pokémon Go root detection.

Why are you even trying anymore?
SUHIDE
Chainfire updated his SuHide program FOR ANDROID 6.0 AND ABOVE (For Android versions under 6.0, you're out of luck!). SuHide hides the root binary and passes Android Safety Net allowing you to play Pokemon Go with root. Not only is it working but it works with Xposed, so you can have all you Pokemon Go Xposed modules back. (I don't condone using spoofer modules)
INSTALLING SUHIDE
TWRP REQUIRED
Remember this is only for Android 6.0 and newer. If you install it on the wrong software, your device could get bricked. If you don't know what a bricked device is, you probably shouldn't be doing this! Also, SUHide is highly experimental. If this doesn't work for you, don't be surprised. And don't be afraid to ask for help in the comments. :)
Make sure you pass SafetyNet before doing this! You can check if you pass it or not with this app after done.
echo "SYSTEMLESS=true" > /data/.supersu
You're Done! Go ahead and install your modules in the Material Xposed App. To enter Pokemom Go, toggle root switch within the app.
submitted by TheJakeGaming to TheSilphRoad [link] [comments]

[Guide] How to bypass SafetyNet & Error 803-3001 (Android)

FE: Heroes uses Google's SafetyNet API, which checks your device's integrity; in other words, it checks if your device has been "tampered with or otherwise modified". This API is used for example in Android Pay, some banking apps and Pokémon GO. For Heroes, the purpose is most probably to block any kind of cheating in the game.
If your device does not pass this check, the game won't even show up in Google Play when you search for it. You will get the error in the game after some time has passed after the initial installation.
Now, some people may have encountered this error even if they haven't modified their phone in any way. Why? Because some devices (especially Chinese brands) have already been set up in the manufacturing process in a way that Google does not find OK.
There's also apparently a known bug that causes the error code even for devices that pass SafetyNet. It is unknown if this bug has been fixed.
For those who know that their device is modifed, here are some things you can try to get around SafetyNet:

I don't need root or Xposed

Removing root:

  1. Install the latest SuperSU from Google Play (or APKMirror, if you can't access Play), if you don't already have it.
  2. If you get prompts when launching the app, ignore/cancel them.
  3. Go to settings, scroll down to the "Full unroot" option and tap it.
  4. Press continue, wait until it's done.
  5. Reboot.

Removing Xposed:

Method I – Recovery mode
  1. Download the latest Xposed uninstaller .zip from here.
  2. Flash the .zip in your device's recovery mode.
  3. Reboot.
Method II – Xposed Installer
  1. Install the Xposed Installer .apk from here (Android 4.0.3—4.4) or here (Android 5.0/5.1/6.0), if you don't already have it.
  2. Find the tab that has your version of Xposed.
  3. Press the uninstall button, confirm.
  4. Wait until it's done.
  5. Reboot.
Still not passing? Make sure that your SELinux is set to enforcing (you can check this from Settings → About phone → SELinux status). Permissive SELinux is known to trigger SafetyNet. You may need to use a different ROM/kernel with enforcing SELinux.
Also, make sure you don't have any su binaries left in /system/bin or /system/xbin.

I want to keep root

Method I – Magisk (Android 5.0+)

I have systemless SuperSU:
  1. Do a full unroot (steps above)
  2. Download the latest Magisk .zip from XDA.
  3. Flash the .zip in your device's recovery mode.
  4. Reboot.
  5. Install Magisk Manager from Google Play (removed from Google Play as of June 1st) from XDA.
  6. Go to the Settings section, enable Magisk Hide.
  7. Go to the Magisk Hide section, find FE: Heroes on the list and tick the checkbox.
I don't have systemless SuperSU:
  1. Install Magisk Manager from Google Play (or from XDA, if you can't access Play).
  2. Go to the Settings section, enable Magisk Hide.
  3. Go to the Install section, default settings should be fine.
  4. Tap Magiskify, choose "download & install".
  5. Wait until it's done.
  6. Reboot.
  7. Go to the Magisk Hide section, find FE: Heroes on the list and tick the checkbox.
If you don't know if you have systemless SuperSU or not, install Magisk Manager. It will tell you if you have it in the Status section.
In the installation process, Magisk will automatically remove any existing root solutions and replace them with MagiskSU – unless you have systemless SuperSU, in which case Magisk will use it instead. But Magisk Hide only works with MagiskSU, so SuperSU first needs to be uninstalled. After installing Magisk, you won't need any external root manager apps you might have (like SuperSU or Superuser); Magisk Manager has a built-in superuser manager.

Method II – Root Switch (Android 4.4+)

  1. Install the Root Switch 1.3.3.2 .apk from here (official thread is here, but I copied the file to Drive to save people from registering to the site).
  2. Enable "Stop all su daemons" & "Toggle USB debugging".
  3. Toggle root off.
Make sure to turn root on again whenever you're not playing the game – you may lose root if you have it turned off when you reboot your device!

I want to keep Xposed

Only for Android 6.0+.
This method is unstable and is known to cause bootloops sometimes. There seems to be problems especially if your system's security patches are from November or later (you can check this from Settings → About phone → Android security patch level). Proceed with caution.

1 – Installing suhide

  1. Uninstall any Xposed version you may have on your device currently (steps above).
  2. Download the latest suhide & Xposed v86.2 by topjohnwu from here.
  3. In your device's recovery mode, flash the suhide .zip, then the Xposed .zip.
  4. Reboot (and hope for the best).

2 – Blacklisting the game:

  1. Open a terminal of your choice and get root rights with the su command. You can also use the terminal in your recovery mode, if available.
  2. Get the UID of FE: Heroes with the command ls -nld /data/data/com.nintendo.zaba. The UID is the second number displayed, usually in this format: 10xxx.
  3. Add FE: Heroes to suhide's blacklist with the command su/suhide/add UID (replace UID with the number you got with the previous command).
  4. Reboot.
OR
  1. Install this GUI from Google Play (or from GitHub, if you can't access Play).
  2. Find FE: Heroes from the list and tick the checkbox.
  3. Reboot.
And for all steps: remember to grant superuser rights whenever prompted.
If you can't pass SafetyNet after these steps, it may be that your kernel does not hide an unlocked bootloader, which is known to trigger SafetyNet. You may need to switch to a different kernel. The most popular ROM, LineageOS, is known to not hide the bootloader status, since they want to comply with Google's security policies.
Removing deviceAccount:.xml from /data/data/com.nintendo.zaba/shared_prefs/ or reinstalling the game also gets around the error, but only for a short time. Remember to link the game to your Nintendo Account before doing this, otherwise you will lose all progress in the game.
User NeffeZz has also created a helper app for rooted devices, which automatically removes the .xml file and restarts the game, you can check it out in this thread.
Unfortunately, there are some devices (again, usually from Chinese brands) which won't pass SafetyNet with any of these methods. For example, devices with built-in root which cannot be removed.
Magisk Manager has a built-in SafetyNet checker, but if you don't use Magisk, you can install a separate app, e.g. this one. Results may not be 100 % correct.
Also, keep in mind that the game might store the info that your device was not allowed once. Even if your device now passes SafetyNet, you may need to reinstall the game.
If you know of any other methods or maybe find a mistake, please tell me on the comments and I will edit this post.
I'll try to answer any questions about this, but I do have to work and sleep too!
Disclaimer: I am not responsible for any data loss or damage on your device and I can't guarantee these methods will work for you. Always make sure to have a backup.
submitted by I_get_in to FireEmblemHeroes [link] [comments]

[Guide] Finding battery issues with Google's Battery Historian (no root)

So I posted this over on /Nexus5X and /GooglePixel since those are my main devices but people suggested posting here too and the mods okayed it so here I am.

Introduction

I thought I'd post a guide on how to use Google's battery historian tool. I should briefly mention that I did not develop and am not responsible for the tool. I just found it and figured out how to use it.
Briefly, this is a glimpse of what it gives you:
It's a pretty handy and powerful tool but since it requires a bit of programming (or at least command line) familiarity to set it up, I set up an instance here on a spare server I had laying around. I've also set up binaries that you can run yourself although you'll need a little knowledge of command line (you need to run the binary with the working directory set to the directory it's in). You can use this with the browser directly on your phone if you need to (although it's fiddly) but it works best on a PC with a nice big screen and mouse/touchpad.
DISCLAIMER: The following guide uses bugreports to analyse battery usage. Bugreports, as they contain full logcat data and the names of sync wakelocks (among other things), may sometimes contain private information (like email addresses). While I promise that the server above doesn't store your bugreports or any of the information contained within, you should know what you're doing when you follow the below steps.

Guide

So let's say your battery life isn't what you'd hope and you want to know why. What do you do?
First of all, you need to capture what's known as a "bugreport". A bugreport is a giant blob of logcat, dumpsys and dumpstate. It contains tons of logs from apps on your device as well as a bunch of system stuff like what wakelocks were held when, when wifi was on or off and the like. As disclaimed above, the logcat data in your bugreport can contain sensitive information. As such, you probably shouldn't go posting them on public forums or the like without having a look through to see what's in there.
So how do you get a bugreport? There are two ways:
Once you have a bugreport, you simply upload your .zip or .txt to Historian and you get a shiny UI with breakdowns of stuff. If you're on your phone and you saved to Drive, the bugreport should be in the recents section of the file picker.
Here's a walkthrough of the sections.

System stats tab

Aggregated stats

The top section is the Aggregated Stats section. It has the following information:
Field Explanation
Duration/Realtime The amount of data the bugreport has. Typically this is the time between when you last fully charged your phone and now.
Screen on/off discharge rate The %/h at which your phone lost power while the screen was on/off (and the total percentage of your battery that was lost in this state)
Screen on time The amount of time the screen was on.
Screen off uptime The amount of time the screen was off but the CPU was on (wakelock).
Userspace wakelock time The amount of time apps on your device kept the CPU running while the screen was off.
Sync Activity The amount of time spent syncing accounts (the ones listed in Settings->Accounts) and the number of times they were synced.
JobScheduler Activity The amount of time and number of times spent on jobs scheduled by apps (these are usually syncs slightly different from the above)
App Wakeup Alarms The number of times an app tried to wake up the phone.
CPU Usage The amount of time a CPU spent doing things. Note that since this is a multi core phone and multiple cores can run at once, this can exceed the amount of time the phone spent running.
Kernel overhead time I'm not too sure but I think this is the amount of time the kernel kept the device awake while the screen was off.
Kernel Wakelocks The time/number of times the kernel kept the phone awake while the screen was off.
Wakeup Reasons The time/number of times the kernel woke up the phone while the screen was off.
Mobile KB/hr The average data usage rate for mobile.
Total WiFi Scan Activity The time/number of times the device spent scanning for wifi networks.
Total WiFi Full Lock Activity The amount of time the wifi was kept active (not sure if screen has to be off or not)
Mobile Active Time The amount of time the radio was active.
Signal Scanning Time The amount of time the radio spent searching for a signal.
Full Wakelock Time Not entirely sure... My understanding is that usually a full wakelock requires the screen to be on. This might be used by apps that prevent the screen from turning off.
Interactive Time Basically SoT again for some reason...
Device Idle Mode Enabled Time I believe this is Doze.
Device Idling Time I believe this is the amount of time the device spent in the conditions that would trigger Doze (physically stationary, unused) but not necessarily in Doze.
Camera Use Length/number of times the camera was used.
Modem Transfer Time Time switching cell towers I think.
Modem Idle Time Time the modem spent doing nothing.

Device's power estimates

Screenshot
This is basically the same as the "Battery" menu in settings but with fancier names. Notable things here:

Userspace partial wakelocks

Screenshot
This is a breakdown of how much time and how many times each of the apps on your device kept the CPU awake.

Syncmanager syncs

Screenshot
This has the duration and count of all the account syncs your device does. This is stuff like refreshing calendar or fetching gmail messages.

JobScheduler Jobs

Screenshot
Briefly mentioned before. Things apps schedule a little in the future, like syncing Twitter.

CPU Usage By App

Screenshot
CPU time spent on each app. If your phone is hot, look here.

Mobile Radio Activity Per App

Screenshot
This is looking at the amount of time the app takes up on the radio. More time = bad.

Mobile Traffic Per App

Screenshot
Amount of traffic per app. More traffic = bad.

WiFi Scan Activity Per App

Screenshot
Time/times spent scanning for wifi networks.

WiFi Full Lock Activity Per App

Screenshot
Time an app spent using wifi so that it couldn't turn off.

Kernel Wakesources

Screenshot
Things that made the kernel wake up. Usually hardware like wifi/cell/bluetooth.

Kernel Wakeup Reasons

Screenshot
One source can have many reasons to wake up the phone. I think this is a more fine grained version of the above.

App Wakeup Alarms

Screenshot
I think these might be like delayed tasks that aren't regular.

App ANRs and Crashes

Screenshot
Errors that shut down the app.

Camera Use By App

Screenshot
Amount of time each app used the camera.

Time Spent In Each App State

Screenshot
I believe here the states are:

Historian 2.0 tab

Screenshot
This is arguably the most useful part. It'll show you how fast your battery drains at any given point and what the state of the device was at that time. It's the most helpful tool for finding where to look.
You can hover over points in time and blocks on the bars to see the battery drain, level and time details, as well as other details depending on which bar you hover on.
I think the best way to learn this is just to play with it so I won't go into too much more depth.

History Stats tab

To be entirely honest I haven't figured out most of this section yet.

App stats tab

This basically just has a breakdown of the things a particular app has been doing. Use it when you suspect a particular app is up to no good.

How to use all this

So this is all well and good but how the hell do you use it?
I noticed yesterday (well actually this is from a year ago but I left it here because it's useful) that even though my phone was off, it got quite hot and the battery was burning away. So I wanted to see what caused this. The process basically went like this:
So I seem to have nailed down the culprit, now what do I do about it?
There are a few options:

Conclusion

Hurrah, I updated this thing for the first time in a year.

Troubleshooting

In the past I've used this with:
However I'm not entirely sure how well it'll do with bugreports from other devices. Generally when there are issues it's a result of a bug on the device crashing the battery stats dump process which ends up printing a Java exception into the bugreport. If this happens you can try unzipping the bugreport and editing the .txt in an editor directly and removing the traceback. I've had to do that before.
Also, while the server I'm running now is much larger than the one I was using previously, I'm not sure how much traffic it'll take so if it breaks... \o/
submitted by bobobo1618 to Android [link] [comments]

Newest SafetyNet check detects System-less root (Android Pay no longer works while rooted)

Many users including myself have noted that as of today, SafetyNet checks (via the "SafetyNet Helper" app on the play store are failing with system-less root in place. Although sad, we all saw it inevitably coming.
Before anybody says "You aren't doing it right!", I am. This is widespread. I have a Nexus 6P on the January update with system-less root w/o xbin_bind. I don't have XPosed. Havent even ever remounted /system W (doesn't affect SafetyNet anyway). Have no weird binaries or libraries anywhere.
For those of you who say " Android Pay still opens for me!", it does, because AP only does a CTS token check on first open, when a card is added, and at the time of payment, so, you won't notice unless you open the SafetyNet helper app and run a check, or attempt to pay. If you attempt to pay, it won't seem to fail, it'll give you the green check mark, but will not process any transaction (your mileage may vary on whether or not it silently fails, or gives an error message).
Sucks it happened this soon, but we all had to see it coming. Its a security risk to banks, who could be held liable for fraudulent transactions, ect.
EDIT: This is server side, and can't be fixed by downgrading Google Play Services, Android Pay, or anything else.
EDIT 2: It has been reported that the corporate "MobileIron" safety check also detects System-less root as of today. This means system-less will no longer allow you to sidestep GFE (Good For Enterprise), Security Policies, etc.
EDIT 3: Using the "Full Unroot" option I'm system-less SuperSU will return SafetyNet (and Android Pay) functionality, but then to regain root, you would need to reboot to (or temporarily Boot TWRP), and reflash System-less SU (w/o XBIN_BIND).
submitted by npjohnson1 to Android [link] [comments]

[GUIDE] Finding battery issues with Google's battery historian tool (no root needed)

So I posted this over on /Nexus5X a while ago and now that I'm a Pixel user and support has been added, why not post this here too? My Pixel hasn't been nearly as bad on battery life as my 5X but it's still not perfect. Also the tool has been updated a few times since I last wrote this so I figured I should update it somewhere.

Introduction

I thought I'd post a guide on how to use Google's battery historian tool. I should briefly mention that I did not develop and am not responsible for the tool. I just found it and figured out how to use it.
Briefly, this is a glimpse of what it gives you:
It's a pretty handy and powerful tool but since it requires a bit of programming (or at least command line) familiarity to set it up, I set up an instance here on a spare server I had laying around. I've also set up binaries that you can run yourself although you'll need a little knowledge of command line (you need to run the binary with the working directory set to the directory it's in). You can use this with the browser directly on your phone if you need to (although it's fiddly) but it works best on a PC with a nice big screen and mouse/touchpad.
DISCLAIMER: The following guide uses bugreports to analyse battery usage. Bugreports, as they contain full logcat data (among other things), may sometimes contain private information. While I promise that the server above doesn't store your bugreports or any of the information contained within, you should know what you're doing when you follow the below steps.

Guide

So let's say your battery life isn't what you'd hope and you want to know why. What do you do?
First of all, you need to capture what's known as a "bugreport". A bugreport is a giant blob of logcat, dumpsys and dumpstate. It contains tons of logs from apps on your device as well as a bunch of system stuff like what wakelocks were held when, when wifi was on or off and the like. As disclaimed above, the logcat data in your bugreport can contain sensitive information. As such, you probably shouldn't go posting them on public forums or the like without having a look through to see what's in there.
So how do you get a bugreport? There are two ways:
Once you have a bugreport, you simply upload your .zip or .txt to Historian and you get a shiny UI with breakdowns of stuff.
Here's a walkthrough of the sections.

System stats tab

Aggregated stats

The top section is the Aggregated Stats section. It has the following information:
Field Explanation
Duration/Realtime The amount of data the bugreport has. Typically this is the time between when you last fully charged your phone and now.
Screen on/off discharge rate The %/h at which your phone lost power while the screen was on/off (and the total percentage of your battery that was lost in this state)
Screen on time The amount of time the screen was on.
Screen off uptime The amount of time the screen was off but the CPU was on (wakelock).
Userspace wakelock time The amount of time apps on your device kept the CPU running while the screen was off.
Sync Activity The amount of time spent syncing accounts (the ones listed in Settings->Accounts) and the number of times they were synced.
JobScheduler Activity The amount of time and number of times spent on jobs scheduled by apps (these are usually syncs slightly different from the above)
App Wakeup Alarms The number of times an app tried to wake up the phone.
CPU Usage The amount of time a CPU spent doing things. Note that since this is a multi core phone and multiple cores can run at once, this can exceed the amount of time the phone spent running.
Kernel overhead time I'm not too sure but I think this is the amount of time the kernel kept the device awake while the screen was off.
Kernel Wakelocks The time/number of times the kernel kept the phone awake while the screen was off.
Wakeup Reasons The time/number of times the kernel woke up the phone while the screen was off.
Mobile KB/hr The average data usage rate for mobile.
Total WiFi Scan Activity The time/number of times the device spent scanning for wifi networks.
Total WiFi Full Lock Activity The amount of time the wifi was kept active (not sure if screen has to be off or not)
Mobile Active Time The amount of time the radio was active.
Signal Scanning Time The amount of time the radio spent searching for a signal.
Full Wakelock Time Not entirely sure... My understanding is that usually a full wakelock requires the screen to be on. This might be used by apps that prevent the screen from turning off.
Interactive Time Basically SoT again for some reason...
Device Idle Mode Enabled Time I believe this is Doze.
Device Idling Time I believe this is the amount of time the device spent in the conditions that would trigger Doze (physically stationary, unused) but not necessarily in Doze.
Camera Use Length/number of times the camera was used.
Modem Transfer Time Time switching cell towers I think.
Modem Idle Time Time the modem spent doing nothing.

Device's power estimates

Screenshot
This is basically the same as the "Battery" menu in settings but with fancier names. Notable things here:

Userspace partial wakelocks

Screenshot
This is a breakdown of how much time and how many times each of the apps on your device kept the CPU awake.

Syncmanager syncs

Screenshot
This has the duration and count of all the account syncs your device does. This is stuff like refreshing calendar or fetching gmail messages.

JobScheduler Jobs

Screenshot
Briefly mentioned before. Things apps schedule a little in the future, like syncing Twitter.

CPU Usage By App

Screenshot
CPU time spent on each app. If your phone is hot, look here.

Mobile Radio Activity Per App

Screenshot
This is looking at the amount of time the app takes up on the radio. More time = bad.

Mobile Traffic Per App

Screenshot
Amount of traffic per app. More traffic = bad.

WiFi Scan Activity Per App

Screenshot
Time/times spent scanning for wifi networks.

WiFi Full Lock Activity Per App

Screenshot
Time an app spent using wifi so that it couldn't turn off.

Kernel Wakesources

Screenshot
Things that made the kernel wake up. Usually hardware like wifi/cell/bluetooth.

Kernel Wakeup Reasons

Screenshot
One source can have many reasons to wake up the phone. I think this is a more fine grained version of the above.

App Wakeup Alarms

Screenshot
I think these might be like delayed tasks that aren't regular.

App ANRs and Crashes

Screenshot
Errors that shut down the app.

Camera Use By App

Screenshot
Amount of time each app used the camera.

Time Spent In Each App State

Screenshot
I believe here the states are:

Historian 2.0 tab

Screenshot
This is arguably the most useful part. It'll show you how fast your battery drains at any given point and what the state of the device was at that time. It's the most helpful tool for finding where to look.
You can hover over points in time and blocks on the bars to see the battery drain, level and time details, as well as other details depending on which bar you hover on.
I think the best way to learn this is just to play with it so I won't go into too much more depth.

History Stats tab

To be entirely honest I haven't figured out most of this section yet.

App stats tab

This basically just has a breakdown of the things a particular app has been doing. Use it when you suspect a particular app is up to no good.

How to use all this

So this is all well and good but how the hell do you use it?
I noticed yesterday (well actually this is from a year ago but I left it here because it's useful) that even though my phone was off, it got quite hot and the battery was burning away. So I wanted to see what caused this. The process basically went like this:
So I seem to have nailed down the culprit, now what do I do about it?
There are a few options:

Conclusion

Hurrah, I updated this thing for the first time in a year.
submitted by bobobo1618 to GooglePixel [link] [comments]

[Guide] Here's My Attempt At A Rooting Guide For The S7/S7 Edge

Snapdragon S7/S7 Edge Root Guide

I recently moved from a Rooted + Xposed Nexus 6 to a Verizon S7, and wanted to figure out how I could install some of the same tweaks I had on my previous phone. After painful google-fu and combing this subreddit, I finally got my phone working the way I wanted. Here's how I did it, I hope I can help others avoid making some of the dumb mistakes I made.
ps, some of the stuff might seem like complete basics, but I'm covering it in detail to help out fellow noobs.
pps, most of these steps were stolen from this XDA post

Useful info:

What you'll need for root:

The actual root guide:

  1. Create a backup of your data.
  2. Install the Samsung USB Drivers.
  3. Install ADB systemwide. If you have problems with this, or your PC doesn't recognize ADB commands through the terminal, there are quick and dirty ways to get around it, message me for details.
  4. On your phone, go to Settings -> Lock screen and security. Turn off "Secure startup", because it prevents the su (Superuser) binary from providing root.
  5. Connect your phone to PC with a USB cable. Turn on USB Debugging in Developer Settings (if you don't have this, go to Settings About Phone tap the build number 7 times until it unlocks 'developer options'), and change the mode of USB from CHARGING to FILE TRANSFER (MTP).
  6. Create a directory somewhere on your PC where you'll keep all the S7 files (even if you're only keeping them temporarily) to stay organized.
  7. Create a subdirectory called 'odin', and download and extract Odin 3.12 into it. Source 2 for odin (some AT&T users reported that this version prevents bootloop).
  8. Download the rooted boot image for your phone: Boot image for S7 || Boot image for S7 Edge. Note that this download is a .TAR file and while it looks like an archive, you should not extract its contents.
  9. Power off your phone. After that, press and hold the 'Volume Down' and 'Home' buttons. While still holding those down, press and hold the power button as well. Your phone will boot into Download mode. Press 'Volume up' to confirm that you want to enter download mode.
  10. Right click on 'odin.exe', run as administrator.
  11. Click on checkbox next to the the 'AP' button. Then, click the actual 'AP' button, and locate the rooted boot image you downloaded in step 8. Click start to flash it.
  12. When the phone has rebooted, go back and make sure 'USB Debugging' is still enabled. Then, download the SU package and extract its contents.
  13. Start the SuperSU flash package by double-clicking 'root.bat'. If double-clicking 'root.bat' only briefly shows a command prompt that quickly disappears, then most likely your PC is not recognized/authorized for USB debugging, the USB cable isn't connected, or ADB isn't properly installed. Message me and I'll try to help out.
  14. When the phone reboots, CONGRATS, you're rooted. If the SU app asks you to update 'su' binary, dismiss this notice for now as Chainfire, the author of SU, has indicated that this build is unsupported and we shouldn't update.

Recommended Next Steps:

  1. Debloat and fix several issues with the phone (CPU lag issues, poor battery performance, phone becoming too hot, Wi-Fi not saving passwords, hotspot/tethering not working, searching for service issues, MMS not working, unauthorized security nag notification, etc.). I did install this script, but it had some unnecessary shit like call recording. While that's cool, and I might actually use it, it's not everyone's cup of tea. However, it also helped with battery life and some critical errors like the phone not remembering wifi passwords.
  2. Open the SuperSU app (installed during the root process) and tap on Settings Security "Enable su during boot". This will ensure that startup scripts get to do their job correctly.
  3. Install FlashFire. This lets you flash packages like the debloat script, which is the same package for either S7 or S7 edge: fixes only || fixes + debloat
  4. Launch FlashFire on the phone and click the (+) button in the lower right to add a step. Select a 'Flash ZIP or OTA' flash step. Locate the flashable ZIP package and select it. For options, check on 'Mount /system read/write' and leave the rest of the options unchecked. Scroll all the way down and click the 'Flash' lightning button in the lower left to commit this single step and wait a few moments. You should see the phone flash the package briefly before rebooting twice.
  5. Install Xposed. Don't install the normal Xposed from the Xposed site, because it tends to cause a bootloop. Wanam has created a custom build of v85 for the S7/S7 edge: Xposed v85 Wanam || Xposed uninstaller || Xposed Installer Wanam
  6. To install Xposed, launch FlashFire on the phone and click the (+) button in the lower right to add a step. Select a 'Flash ZIP or OTA' flash step. Locate the Xposed flashable ZIP package and select it. Check on 'Mount /system read/write' and leave the rest of the options unchecked. Click the (+) button again to add another step. Select Wipe and only choose to wipe the 'Dalvik cache' and the 'Cache partition'. Scroll down and click the 'Flash' lightning button and wait a few moments. You should see the phone flash the package briefly before rebooting twice. During the final reboot, you will see the animated boot screen appear for a very long time (three to five minutes or longer) before the screen changes to an 'Android is starting...' green screen with animated gears indicating that it is 'optimizing' apps. It is building a new Dalvik cache which should take several minutes. This is all normal; so no need to panic if it takes longer! Once the phone finally finishes booting, you can continue.
  7. Install busybox from the play store. This is a utility which adds a bunch of Unix tools to your phone, which can be useful and is required for certain other tools (like Titanium Backup) to work.
  8. That's it. You're done!

Unrooting:

  1. Check Settings About phone for the baseband version. Mine is G930VVRU4API3. (This matters because after a certain update (PH1?) Samsung changed the bootloader, so if you try to unroot and install any random stock firmware for your device, it might not flash correctly and give you an error. You'll need firmware of your current version or above to successfully flash stock.)
  2. Visit androidfilehost and search your baseband number. Find a result which matches, and download it.
  3. Extract the '.tar.md5' files which start with AP, CP, CSC, BL. Use HOME_CSC if you don't want to wipe the phone during this return to stock.
  4. Right click Odin and run as administrator
  5. Select each appropriate file (click AP, select AP file, etc.)
  6. Select each checkbox
  7. Click start, wait for it to finish
  8. You're done!
this is it! please comment/message me suggestions or edits I should add to make this guide more accurate and informative.
submitted by dangerousdesi221 to GalaxyS7 [link] [comments]

Updated method to root, install TWRP, and CyanogenMod. (Or any custom ROM.)

I noticed the guide on the sidebar hasn't been updated in awhile, so I decided to make this post to help others. I hope this helps you guys, good luck!
THIS GUIDE IS FOR ALL VARIANTS OF THE LG G3
Rooting:
There are many methods that I have found that work on both Kitkat and Lollipop.
Method 1
Method 2
LG has been patching exploits in the latest updates, so if the first 2 don't work, give this method (Method 3) a try. It's based on method 1 but modified a little bit.
If you are experiencing difficulty in rooting, please try the "fix" below:
This only applies to method 1 and 3.
Step 1: Open the folder which contains the root, ADB drivers, etc.
Step 2: Hold shift and right click on blank space of the folder, then click "Open CMD here".
Step 3: Type "adb devices" to start the daemon process.
See Note below
Step 4: Unlock your phone. You should see a box with an MD5 number and a check box. Check "Always allow from this computer" and then hit "OK".
Note: You may need to type this a few times.
PLEASE READ: Many users are experiencing difficulty in rooting lately. I do not know why - It may be LG and/or their carrier has been patching exploits in the recent update, it may be the user did not follow the steps correctly, etc.
Either way, I have found 2 new methods/tools. They are below:
Method 4: I have not tried this, so please let me know if it works.
Method 5 This is an apk file, which suprisingly works up to Android 5.1.1. Yes, it is an app that roots Lollipop! Virtually unheard of right? Chinese people are fantastic with electronics lol!
For method 5, it installs there "KingUser" instead of SuperSU, HOWEVER, you can install SuperSU after rooting. Heres how:
Step 1: Follow any of the methods for installig TWRP below.
Step 2: Download SuperSU zip from here.
Step 3: Reboot to TWRP using a reboot app or widget, etc. And flash the zip.
Step 4: Reboot system, download system apl remover or a similar app, and unistall KingUser.
Step 5: Go to SuperSU and update the binary if needed and reboot.
Step 6: You should now have a working SuperSU application and root!
Method 6 (For LS990ZVA)
This method is for the LS990ZVA, as the other methods included in my guide aren't working for them.
Thanks, Ferroseed :)
In the unlikely case that not a single method above worked, don't worry my friend, you still have hope!
Please note: The method below is a last resort, so please don't do this unless you absolutely can't root your phone and have already tried everything, as well as double, triple, or even quadrupole checked to make sure you are doing every step for every method word to word.
YOU CAN ALSO USE THIS METHOD TO UNBRICK YOUR PHONE!
Follow this guide to flash back to KitKat.
Once done, go through the setup process, etc. and install Stump Root or Towelroot. This will root your phone. To install TWRP, use method 2 below or just download the image from here and install Flashify from the Play Store. Open Flashify, grant root access, chose "Flash Recovery", chose your file, select "Yup!", and reboot.
Done!
Note: If you're still on Kitkat, give Stump Root or Towelroot a try first.
Rooted? Good, now let's move on to installing TWRP!
Installing TWRP:
There are currently two methods to flash TWRP. I tried method 1 and it worked without any issues, so I recommend it. Method 2 is currently causing issues for users, use method 1.
Method 1:
Step 1: Download Flashify from the Play Store.
Step 2: Download the TWRP image for your device from here.
Step 3: Open Flashify and grant it root access.
Step 4: Select "Recovery Image" and select the "Chose File" option, select the image you just downloaded.
Step 5: Chose "Yup!" and then reboot when it prompts you too.
[Method 2 ](In my experience this Method has the highest chance of success and is the easiest.)](http://forum.xda-developers.com/lg-g3/general/apk-flash-twrp-autorec-thanks-to-t3081396) Warning: Users are reporting Security Error at boot after using the app to flash TWRP. Use method 1.
Got TWRP installed? Fantastic! We're almost there!
Installing CloudyG3 2.5
Step 1: Download CloudyG3
Step 2: Once downloaded, open TWRP manager and reboot to recovery.
Step 3: Once in recovery, make a backup. (ALWAYS make a backup!!!)
Step 4: Now hit back until you're at the home screen. Select wipe and then advanced wipe. Check the boxes for data, system, dalvik, cache. Hit wipe and wait until finished.
Step 5: Now hit back until you're at the home screen. Hit install and navigate to the download folder. Select CloudyG3 and hit install.
Step 6: CloudyG3 has an Aroma installer. Select your model and other preferred options. Once done check reboot now and wait for it to reboot.
NOTE: CloudyG3 takes some time to boot up on the first boot, so don't worry. It will boot up.
Flashing Gabriel Kernel (Stock-based ROMs only) and Tweaking the Kernel
Step 1: Download Gabriel Kernel from here.
Step 2: Once downloaded, reboot to recovery.
Step 3: Navigate to install and select the Gabriel Kernel zip.
Step 4: Swipe to install and reboot.
Step 5: Download kernel auditor via the Play Store.
Tweaking the Kernel
To tweak Gabriel Kernel, AllSpark kernel settings must be applied first. Download and flash them in recovery here.
Now that you have applied AllSpark settings, you can start to flash other settings.
HotrodV1 (Performance with good battery)
IronhideV2.1 (Very good battery, good performance) - This setting is my favorite. I get around 5-5 and a half hours with it, heavy usage. The performance is also very good.
JetfireV1 (Performance with battery)
OptimusPrimeV1.2 (Best all-rounder)
build.prop tweaks
This will add and tweak some things in your build.prop file to help battery life and performance a little. I did notice a slight difference.
Original thread for kernel settings
Original Gabriel Kernel thread
Installing CyanogenMod
Step 1: Download the latest Nightly for your devices model number from [here.](download.cyanogenmod.org)
Step 2: Download the latest gapps from here (Google Apps. These are required if you want the Play Store, Gmail, etc.)
Note: There are many other better Gapps out there, such as Banks Gapps, TK Gapps, etc. All of these can be found with a quick google search.
Step 3: Use TWRP manager or a reboot manager such as Simple Reboot, quick reboot, etc., to reboot into recovery.
Step 4: Once in recovery, select wipe, then advanced wipe. Check System, Data, Dalvik, Cache.
Step 5: Go back to the home screen and select Install. Navigate to the Download folder and select the CyanogenMod zip.
Step 6: Select "Add Another Zip" and navigate to the Download folder again. Select the gapps zip.
Step 7: Select install now and wait for it to flash the Zips.
Step 8: Select reboot now and then you're done!
Flashing Nebula Kernel (CM/AOSP/Slim-Based ROMs Only)
Step 1: Download Nebula Kernel from here.
Step 2: Reboot to recovery and flash (no need to wipe anything).
Step 3: Reboot and you're done!
Tweaking the Kernel
First and foremost, you'll need to download Kernel Aduitor from the Play Store.
The best combination that I've found is the followimg:
  • CPU Governor set to zzmove.
  • Profile_Number set to 2 (ybat/yank battery) (Profile_Number is in "Governor Tunables)
These settings are a great performance/battery combination.
Easiest way to install Xposed:
Step 1: Download the apk from this link.
Step 2: Grant it root access and hit the install button. (It takes a little time to respond so don't worry)
Step 3: It will now automatically boot into TWRP. Wait for it to finish and now it will automatically reboot.
Step 4: Wait for the optimization of the apps.
That's it. Extremely easy, right? To thank bender_007 over at the XDA thread!
EDIT: Kernel and guide to disbale over sharpening
EDIT 2: CyanogenMod and CloudyG3 are now both in the guide!
DISCLAIMER: I am NOT responsible for any damage that can/could be caused to your LG G3! You are doing these steps at your own risk! Doing these modifications to your device may void your warranty. I am NOT responsible for that either.
However, if you follow these steps correctly, you should not receive any damage to your device.
I hope this guide helped you and good luck!
submitted by d850help to LGG3 [link] [comments]

[NOOB FRIENDLY][GUIDE] Unroot your Galaxy Note 2/S3 without a computer (and avoid making the flash counter go up)

Hey there, /Android. I have recently been posting a bunch of questions about unrooting and ended up figuring everything out myself. I'm writing this because I'm sure there are others who are/have been in the same boat as me.
NOTE: I've been informed by a commenter that this won't work on all S3 variants due to Mobile Odin and/or Triangle Away being incompatible. The apps will warn you about incompatibility, though.
So before doing any of this I encourage to do a backup in Titanium Backup (or a Nandroid), so if you lose data (in case something goes wrong), you can re-root, restore and then do the procedure again. Though, when I did this I did not lose anything. (I came from a stock ROM though)
So this is mainly for the ones who are on a stock ROM already but rooted (maybe you rooted for Xposed tweaks like me)
Yes, this should enable you for OTA updates as well.
Okay, so to get started, I recommend that you check your flash counter. You can do this by powering off your device, then holding Vol. down+Home+Power. Then your device should come up with a warning screen about flashing custom OS'es, just hit Vol. up.
You should see a screen with an Android logo and saying this:
CUSTOM BINARY DOWNLOAD: (value)
CURRENT BINARY: (value)
SYSTEM STATUS: (value)
(to get back out of this mode, pull the battery or hold the power button)
If CUSTOM BINARY DOWNLOAD: Doesn't say "NO", CURRENT BINARY: doesn't say "SAMSUNG OFFICIAL" and SYSTEM STATUS: Doesn't say "Normal" (or something like that, forgot), you're going to need to install TriangleAway (The free version will do) and reset your flash counter. Follow the instructions in the app.
If you are still on official stuff, move on to this step:
So first you're going to need to go to a site like SamMobile and download the firmware corresponding to your carrieregion. You can find out which one you need by connecting your phone to Samsung Kies and looking under "Current firmware", it should end with something like (TLA) (for Danish/Swedish Telia) or something like that.
Download your firmware, unzip it and put the .tar.md5 file on your phone's internal SD card (I prefer to pull the external during the process, your call though).
Now download Mobile ODIN (free version will do if you're looking to unroot. Premium version has an option called 'EverRoot' which will root the firmware while it's getting flashed; mainly for checking out leaked firmware or updating from a rooted one).
In Mobile ODIN, choose "Select file..." and find the .tar.md5 file you downloaded earlier. Select that and you should be good to go.
Make sure that none of the EverRoot options are checked if you're using the premium version.
Now select "Flash" and (if prompted) choose to verify md5. This will prevent you from installing a corrupted file. Once it has checked the md5 sum, it will reboot into it's own ODIN mode and begin flashing everything the .tar.md5 file included. Once it is done, your phone should reboot and everything should be back to normal! Now, if you want to verify everything, go to the Play Store and download Root Checker. It should conclude that you're not rooted. Now boot back into ODIN mode (Vol. Down+Home+Power) and check your flash counter, system status, etc. Everything should be normal. Last step, boot your phone back up and go to Settings -> About phone -> Status and scroll all the way down to Device Status. This should say Normal.
If everything went right, congratulations! You've just unrooted your phone.
I hate asking for upvotes, but I spent a long time figuring out this method and writing this guide, so I would love if you could upvote this so everyone in need sees it. Also, self post, so no karma gain for me :)
Will do my best to provide support in the comments!
submitted by XxCLEMENTxX to Android [link] [comments]

[Help] Can I use Xposed to patch standart android components in frameworks.jar?

I'm a rookie in customizing android but I can find my way with adb, fastboot or decompiling things. I haven't done any sort of android development.; but I have a fair amount of Linux, system programming and Java programming experience.
I'm running a custom ROM ( Lineage OS) on my Xperia Z5c. I'm extremely happy with it but there is a killer feature that I miss from original Sony ROM. It's the iOS like magnifier which appears when a standard text box is long pressed. It really helps when you have chubby thumbs. I've searched net for a mod, Xposed module or a Magisk module but found nothing. So I tracked possible APIs to add this functionality. It looks like no keyboard has able to implement it either. The feature is implemented in HTC Sense UI and Xperia ROMs AFAIK. So I looked deeper and found that it's implemented in frameworks.jar of Xperia ROM. They implemented a MagnifierView class which is shown when a standard android.widget.TextView is pressed.
Finally It looks like that If I was able to replicate Sony's implementation and modify android's TextView code, I can have the functionality back. So I should either modify Lineage OS code and compile it by myself or patch frameworks.jar using decompilers and binary patchers. Both are non-options for me since I don't want to compile whole Lineage OS, which requires extreme amounts of time to compile, or fiddle with decompiler stuff after each update.
As far as i understand from the docs there may be a third way: Xposed. It can hook functions into method calls of android apps and maybe android itself.
So I want to learn if there is a possibility to use Xposed to hook my function to android.widget.TextView's methods.
Thanks
TL;DR Customization newbie wants iOS like magnifier. I ask if I can use Xposed to patch a method in a class in frameworks.jar file without re/decompiling it.
submitted by idontchooseanid to xposed [link] [comments]

[Guide] Updating your bootloader-unlocked Moto X to 4.4.4 via OTA

I've seen several posts over the last few days with people wondering how to upgrade their bootloader-unlocked Moto X to 4.4.4 using the over-the-air (OTA) update, so I figured I'd post a quick guide so that anyone in this situation can update their device with minimal hassle. The process is fairly straightforward, but some people may not have done it before, and even those who have may enjoy a refresher!
This post is for devices with unlocked bootloaders -- I don't really have experience with the root methods used on locked Moto Xs, so I can't help anyone with that. These exact steps are also specific to the Verizon update rolling out now, but the same general process should apply to other OTAs and other carriers.
I'm also assuming that you have a custom recovery and a rooted device and that you want to restore those after the upgrade -- if you haven't modified the recovery you can probably install the OTA as-is with no issues.
What do I need to install the OTA?
In order to install the OTA, your device needs to have the stock recovery and an unmodified /system partition. What does this mean?
Preparation
Before you get started, make sure you have the following files:
And one final note, make a backup of any important files on your phone. If everything goes correctly you should not lose any data, but since we're messing around with system files on the phone there's always the chance that something catastrophic could happen resulting in the need to wipe the device. Better to be safe than sorry!
The Process
If you're using Xposed, the first thing we need to do is disable it for the duration of the upgrade. To do this, boot into your recovery (probably TWRP), and install the 'Xposed-Recovery-Disabler.zip' file that you should find at the root of your storage. This file is created automatically during the Xposed installation process, and will disable the framework without removing any of your installed modules or settings.
If you don't have the disabler zip or you're otherwise unable to flash it, you can also just hit the 'uninstall' button within the Xposed installer app to do the same thing.
Next, reboot your phone into the bootloader. You can do this by shutting down the phone and then holding the power + volume down buttons to power it back up. (The bootloader screen may not actually show until you release the buttons, so if you don't see anything for ~10 seconds just let them go and it should pop up.) If you were already in TWRP after the previous step, you can also just reboot to the bootloader from there.
Once you're at the bootloader screen, plug your phone into your PC. Open a command prompt in the directory where your fastboot executable is located, and run the command 'fastboot devices'. The tool should print a line showing the serial number of your device and its current state, which is 'fastboot'. If you don't get any output from this command, then your drivers are probably not installed correctly -- check your device manager to see if you have any unrecognized devices, and try reinstalling the Moto device manager to get the proper drivers.
Assuming fastboot recognizes your device, the next step is to flash the stock recovery. You need to tell fastboot where the recovery.img file is -- the easiest way is just to copy it into the current directory; alternately you can provide the full path to the image instead of just specifying 'recovery.img'. The command you need to run is:
fastboot flash recovery recovery.img 
The phone will flash the stock recovery and let you know when it's done.
This step is optional, but recommended. The OTA installer is going to verify a number of files on your device's /system partition, and if any of those files have been modified, the update will refuse to install. If you don't feel that you've made major changes to your device aside from rooting and installing Xposed, you can skip this step and hope for the best. If it turns out that you do have changes that conflict with the update, the OTA will fail to install and you'll need to either manually restore the modified files or come back to this step and flash the stock system image before trying again.
If you want to be certain that the OTA will install without issues, I'd recommend flashing the stock system image now. Note that /system does not contain any user-space apps or data, so you shouldn't lose any information by resetting it.
Just like flashing the recovery.img, you need to have your phone at the bootloader screen with fastboot ready to go, and you need to have the system.img file handy. This time, however, you'll need to use the Motorola fastboot utility since the system.img image is too large for the stock fastboot tool. The the command to run is:
mfastboot flash system system.img 
The system image is fairly large (around a gigabyte) so it may take up to 10-15 minutes to completely install. Be patient!
Now your device is ready to accept the OTA upgrade. If your phone has already prompted you to install it, then you can boot back up into Android and begin that process from the notification, which will reboot the phone into recovery and start the upgrade automatically.
If you're using the downloaded .zip file instead, then select 'Recovery' from the bootloader menu to enter the stock recovery. (Remember that 'volume up' is the select key -- if you hit the power button instead your phone will just power off!) Now you should see a green android icon with a red triangle on it. This looks scary, but don't worry! If you press the power+volume up buttons, the actual recovery menu should pop up. Select the option to apply an update from your storage, then select the OTA zip file that you downloaded earlier. The install process should begin and will take several minutes.
Once the install process is complete, you'll be back at the recovery menu. Select the option to reboot the device, but hold down the power+volume down buttons as it restarts -- we're going straight back to the bootloader to flash our custom recovery.
In the bootloader, make sure that the phone is plugged into your PC and that you have the custom recovery .img file handy, then run the command to flash the new recovery file (I'll assume most people are using TWRP, but substitute the name of your own image file if necessary):
fastboot flash recovery openrecovery-twrp-2.7.1.1-ghost.img 
Assuming you want to root the device as well, go ahead and enter the custom recovery you just flashed and install the SuperSU package or whatever you normally use.
Now you're ready to boot the system up. It will take a little longer than normal, and you'll see the 'Optimizing apps' screen as the device rebuilds the dalvik cache files for each application. Once everything is up and running, head into the Settings -> About Phone menu and check your Android version. You should be on 4.4.4!
The final step is to re-enable any root applications that you have installed. For Xposed, just open up the Xposed installer app and hit the 'install framework' button. You'll need to reboot in order to activate the framework, but afterwards you should find all of your modules and settings exactly how you left them.
Other root apps may also need to be re-enabled or re-activated; check each one and make sure it's doing whatever it's supposed to do. For example, if you're using AdAway you'll need to re-apply the host file modifications.
You're done!
And that's it! The whole process should take no more than 20-30 minutes if you already have the files you need, and you shouldn't lose any data or settings during the upgrade. Now that you're on 4.4.4, check out the new dialer as well as the Motorola Alert app!
Good luck to anyone upgrading, and let me know if there are any changes/updates that need to be made to the guide.
submitted by chrismith85 to MotoX [link] [comments]

Running Barclays app on rooted Android using systemless root

tl;dr: You can't get the app working via RootCloak/with root enabled, but you can make it so that you can disable root without rebooting your phone using systemless root. Xposed needs to be disabled.
I'm creating this thread because there hasn't been any talk about getting the Barclays app working since systemless root was released. Searching for a solution was frustrating, so I decided to just try out systemless root and post my findings so when another person searches how to get the Barclays app working with root, they'll find this post.
Thanks to the RootCloak developer's findings, the Barclays app uses a native library to detect root by sending a request to escalate to root (triggering SuperSU, etc.) and seeing the response, and by looking in the filesystem for /system/xbin/su and its variants. On CM13 (CyanogenMod), the latter can be done by deleting the su binary.
If you use systemless root (i.e., Magisk + phh's su), you have the option of disabling root by unmounting the su binary using a simple toggle in Magisk Manager. As a result, you can open the Barclays app with little inconvenience!
Another topic is Xposed. Having Xposed instaled/enabled, even when running systemless Xposed, will cause the Barclays app to crash after 'Please wait'. As a result, you will need to disable Xposed to run the Barclays app. With systemless Xposed, you don't need to uninstall the framework in recovery to do this. Instead, you can toggle it to disabled in the Material Design Xposed app and soft reboot. This isn't ideal either, but it's better than having to uninstall it entirely.
Edit: It also looks like the app detects root by looking at your Recent Apps for Xposed Installer, etc. However, it plays well with having Xposed Installer installed with the framework disabled and app closed (removed from recent apps).
My device is the LG G3 D855 running CM13 with Magisk v5, phh's SU and systemless Xposed.
submitted by ThePurpleK to Android [link] [comments]

Standby Battery Drain Bug - Fixed!

Please note, I have yet to complete running all my tests so the actual numbers may change, pls dont kill me if i get ur hopes up too much

Setup:

Unlocked bootloader
TWRP 2.8.7.0
SlimLP Nightly 16-8-15
Gapps (This isn't part of stopping battery drain but you should install it anyway because... you know, google play?)
Xposed for Android 5.1 (It is imperative you download the x86 version from here and not another version of Xposed)

Apps

Xposed Installer (Contrary to the name, this is not an installer, but lets you activate Xposed modules)
SuperSU (Not required, but very highly recommended)
BetterBatteryStats (Very useful for seeing what's keeping your device awake/waking it up)
Greenify (Donator Package recommended, but not required)
Amplify (Donation Package required for what we're using it for)

Battery Fix

For the last few weeks I've been looking intently at what's using up my standby battery and I noticed that there were a huge amount of wakeups from components of the system as well as the Phone and Google Play Services. I'll be using Amplify to stop the system from being able to use up my battery, as well as Greenify to stop my messaging apps from doing this.
First, setup your apps. If you are using SuperSU, open the app and select to update the binary, with a normal install. Go into BetterBatteryStats and select to install as a system app (optional). Then go into Greenify, experimental features, set the working mode to 'Boost' (this will require you to activate the Xposed module and reboot). If you have the donator package activate it first by clicking the icon in the launcher. Open Amplify and set it up so that it can see stats about your device. Reboot.
The first thing to do after you install the apps is spend a day using your phone with everything turned on. Leave Location services, bluetooth, NFC and wifi on so Amplify can pick up on their wakelocks and wakeups. Once this is done disable Google Now if you have it turned on (sorry but takes too much battery), set location services to battery saving and turn off NFC (at least for now). I recommend checking BetterBatteryStats (especially the alarms section as this is the biggest culprit on the Zenfone 2)
Go into greenify and click the plus icon to select apps to greenify. I would recommend selecting your internet messaging apps (not SMS) such as Instagram, Facebook and kik (which by the way wakes up your device twice a minute!!!). You do not need to greenify WhatsApp, I have built management of WhatsApp into my Amplify profile Go into greenify, experimental features, and enable these options: Wakeup Timer Coalescing, Telephony Wakeup and Don't remove notifications. If you have the donator package, you may want to enable GCM push which will give more reliable notifications but I'm not sure how much this decreases battery life.
Now the real fun begins. Open up Amplify (Note, you need to buy the donator package) and start by going to the wakelocks section.
In here you want to manage the following (the name of the wakelock is followed by the number of seconds set):
NfcService:mRoutingWakeLock 4800 // Ignore this if you want to keep NFC on Icing 900 SyncLoopWakeLock 480 GCoreFlp 480 NetworkStats 240 Wakeful StateMachine: GeofencerStateMachine 240 // Or higher if you want NlpWakeLock 480 *alarm* 240 // 480 for much bettter battery life NlpCollectorWakeLock 600 
Next you want to go to the Alarms section and repeat it again with the following:
com.android.internal.telephony.data-stall 480 com.whatsapp.messaging.MessageService.LOGOUT_ACTION 240 com.android.chrome/com.google.ipc.invalidation.external.client.contrib.AndroidListener$AlarmReceiver 480 com.android.chrome/com.google.ipc.invalidation.ticl.android2.AndroidInternalScheduler$AlarmReceiver 480 com.android.deskclock.ON_QUATER_HOUR 600 // As the name suggests, this should be called every 15 minutes. Except it's called every few minutes lolwut AlARM_WAKEUP_LOCATOR 480 com.google.android.intent.action.SEND_IDLE 480 com.whatsapp.alarm.CLIENT_PING_TIMEOUT 480 com.whatsapp.messaging.MessageService.CLIENT_PINGER_TIMEOUT 480 com.android.providers.calendar.intent.CalendarProvider2 240 com.facebook.rti.mqtt.c.b.ACTION_INEXACT_ALARM.11961 840 // This is actually from instagram, not facebook com.whatsapp.alarm.AVAILABLE_TIMEOUT 480 com.facebook.rti.mqtt.c.b.ACTION_INEXACT_ALARM.8844 480 ALARM_WAKEUP_ACTIVITY_DETECTION 480 ALARM_WAKEUP2275837 480 // 2275837 is unique, you should have one similar but with different numbers com.facebook.rti.mqtt.common.c.s.ACTION_ALARM.11961 480 com.facebook.tri.mqtt.c.b.ACTION_INEXACT_ALARM.3390 480 com.google.android.intent.action.MCS_HEARTBEAT 480 
Lastly take a look at the Services section. In here I have disabled com.android.chrome/com.google.ipc.invalidation.ticl.android2.TiclService. You may also want to disable com.google.android.gms/.icing.service.IndexWorkerService but I have no idea what it actually is so I'm reluctant to. Reboot after this.
If you see anything else in these three sections that is using up a lot of battery, feel free to manage it as well.
You may also want to take a look at BetterBatteryStats afterwards. After leaving it on standby for a few hours, have a look at the Alarms section to see how much it's improved :)

Downsides

Notifications from apps that use push will be delayed. NFC will most likely be basically broken, but you can alleviate this by removing the Amplify setting for NfcService:mRoutingWakeLock and enabling NFC. Google Now and other 'always on' monitors won't work/will negate the effects of this fix, as they keep your device awake.

RESULTS

I'm gonna preface this with saying that my battery was on the shitty end of the spectrum before this fix. I used to get just 2.5 hours of SOT on stock and 3.5 hours of SOT on cyanogenmod/slimLP. On top of this, I only got around 15 hours of standby time on stock (lol) and 48 hours on CM12 with greenify. I'd also like to say that my slimLP has a bug which means that I don't get any battery stats inside settings, meaning that I can't verify whether this actually gets rid of the "Android OS" drain
With these adjustments my standby went from just 15 hours to 150 hours with WiFi, bluetooth (connected to my watch) and location services turned on which is easily enough for me. I got this number from a test I ran overnight for 6.5 hours, where I lost 4% battery. However, because 4% is so small, this number could be anywhere from 100 to 250 hours. I plan to run more "soon"
My SOT was unchanged however at 3.5 hours.

Tell me what you guys think :)

submitted by mikbob to zenfone2 [link] [comments]

LLSIF Launcher: multi-account manager/launcher (open-source)

Introduction

This is a little tool I made for School Idol Festival (android version) that allows you to easily manage your multiple accounts and log into the game with one of your accounts in a single click. I only tested this in the Bluestacks emulator, but it should also work on a real device.
NOTE: the binaries are packed with UPX to minimize the size, and some anti-viruses might give you a false positive (although it's very unlikely).

Requirements

Before you attempt using this tool, make sure you have the Visual C++ Redist 2013. Also, your emulator or device needs to be rooted. The program also relies on adb, but I have shipped adb with the binaries so it should be fine.

First time set-up

(you can ignore this if you already have xposed + rootcloak and skip to WiFi ADB)

Usage:

(note: this assumes that you already know how multi-accounting works and you have all your renamed GameEngineActivity.xml's in a folder)
(warning: this tool is designed not to erase your xml's but you should still make a back-up and save your transfer codes in case something goes wrong)

Advanced Users:

If for some reason you don't want to use WiFi ADB or you need to change the ip it connects to because you want to use it on a real device, you can change the ConnectCommand parameter in settings.ini

Troubleshooting:

If the tool can't seem to get the file list and you're 100% sure the path you provided is correct, try running fix_adb.bat and trying again. It will reset the adb connection. If it still doesn't work, restart bluestacks and terminate adb from your task manager. Also, make sure that you have no other android device connected to your computer.

Source code:

It's written in pure C + Win32API. The internal library I wrote to control LLSIF through adb is cross-platform and you can re-use it to make a linux frontend if you wish. If you wish to play around with the source code, you can grab it at: https://github.com/Francesco149/llsif_launcher

Legal stuff:

The copies of adb.exe, AdbWinApi.dll or AdbWinUsbApi.dll I shipped with this tool are made by Google and I do not own them.
Copyright 2014 Franc[e]sco ([email protected]) This file is part of llsif_launcher. llsif_launcher is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version. llsif_launcher is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details. You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with llsif_launcher. If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.
submitted by lolisamurai to SchoolIdolFestival [link] [comments]

Visual Land Prestige Elite 10QL : Want to root, run Xposed Frameworks or custom ROM... Problems!

I would like to first root, then use Xposed Frameworks or a custom ROM on my recently purchased Visual Land Prestige Elite 10QL. I am trying to root it straight out of the box. Meaning I haven't even used it yet! :-) Why? Remove bloatware, move files/apps/etc. to SD card, CUSTOMIZE!!!
I am running Lollipop 5.0. I am a novice android tinkerer. I am learning, so give me some slack for my learning curve here, please. :-)
I got it to root using Kingo Root. Great... So, then I went to install Super Su, but it gets a pop-up stating "the su binary needs to be updated. Continue" If you pick the option to continue, you get "If you have a custom recovery like TRWP use to install the su binary. How would you like to install?" Options: normal or TRWP/CWM Soooo, I don't have a backup (I know, BUT like I said it is new and I don't have anything on it, so I did not do a nandroid or any other backup) or I pick Normal and it just tells me to reboot and try again.
Having read everywhere about this issue... there are varying opinions. YES, I am rooted. I tried adding the binary apk file to my SD card, then opening in recovery mode to install the file. But no luck, Super Su won't install properly or at all, I guess. So, my issue is I am rooted, but without a program like Super Su to KEEP me rooted through updates. All else on my list is null and void w/o root.
YAY! I just got the first problem SOLVED! Used an app called Super Sume, which replaces all of the Kingroot files with SuperSu files. Then SuperSu installed successfully and I am still rooted. Wow! I searched all around for a solution and found this in a forum, way, way down deep. Others with Kingroot/SuperSu/missing binary problems should use this app.
Now, custom ROMs. Which allow most customization? Anyone know of any that are compatible with VL Prestige Elite 10 tablets?
Xposed Frameworks, please explain what custom recovery is... do I do this by downloading an app like TRWP (is that an app?) or flash a file ? I just can't find what I need to get this started. All directions something similar to: You must have a rooted device with custom recovery installed in it to use this Official Xposed Framework...) Explain please....
I guess that is all, THAT is enough! LOL Sorry so long, just thought better explanation will help get answer.
Thanks!
submitted by eaking68 to AndroidQuestions [link] [comments]

Elephone P8000 bootloop - any fixes?

My friend recently got an elephone P8000, and asked me to do my magic and remove the ads and bloatware (and awful launcher). Knowing that Elephone usually ships their phones pre-rooted, I downloaded xposed installer, superSU and a root checker.
First sign was when the root checker said it didn't have root. I found it strange, but pushed it aside. Xposed installer (right arch, right OS version) installed, and so did SU. Tried to install/update SU binaries, but it failed. After a reboot, it bootloops.
I can get into recovery, and fastboot. Erasing cache and data and factory resetting didn't fix anything. adb devices doesn't pick the phone up while it's in the recovery either. I'd just oem unlock and flash a custom recovery and get it over with, but apparently there's a toggle to allow that command to work...hidden in the dev options, from the UI which I can't get to. I can't write the recovery with fastboot flash either, it says "FAILED: remote download for partition recovery is not allowed"
Anything else I can try? I really don't want to hand him back an expensive brick. I feel like with most of fastboot access I should be able to do something.
Any help is appreciated in advance!
PS: OH! Also somehow I got into a menu that had asian characters, and it told me it was seeing nearby WiFis (showed my neighbor's WiFi SID), and then it popped up a picture of a cat, promptly rebooting to bootloop a few seconds later.
submitted by octoshrimpy to AndroidQuestions [link] [comments]

I want to remove SuperSu and install Superuser? How do?

I have an LG G3 rooted. It has SuperSu. It seems to be installed via the One Click Root into the actually /system/.
I want to install Superuser because superuser looks nicer and mainly it has a temporary unroot which I think I need because Snapchat wont let me login as Im rooted (and no Im not using Xposed).
SuperSu has an option to "Switch to another Superuser application" however I did that and it uninstalled itself and took "su" binary with it. Which Superuser app couldnt do anything without. So I had to go all the way and one-click root again which again gives me the same SuperSu set up as mentioned earlier
submitted by MuseofRose to AndroidQuestions [link] [comments]

[HELP] SGH-1747 - Either restore or workaround for Good for Enterprise on rooted 4.4.2

Hey folks,
So I successfully installed TWRP Recovery, and rooted my phone for one glorious moment of spoofing a mac address and having a workaround for Hotel Wifi Access issues on a business trip. The problem? This caused Good for Enterprise to stop working. So, I went back tried to unroot my phone. I believe I successfully did so (Triangle flashed away the counter, removed root using default SUPERSu Option, and restored the stock recovery) Then I made the mistake of hitting the "Check for Updates" button on the phone. This appeared to soft-brick the phone -- I had access to Recovery and Download mode but the OS never booted. So, I started from Scratch, installed TWRP, got a stock 4.4.2 rooted rom and flashed it onto my drive. Issue now is that Wifi does not exist as an option. So I reflashed to see if that would fix it and it has not. My concern is that since the 4.4.2 OS was an OTA update and the only roms I see are "Stock_Rooted" that the rom itself is the issue. Would love to flash the 4.3 stock rom, and just do OTA updates to get me back to clean, but that does not appear to be a viable option from ODIN (Fused 3>Binary 0) and I'm scared to try it through TWRP flash for fear of bricking the phone as from everything I've read, you can't downgrade to 4.3 from 4.4.2 because of the bootloader...Sooooooo. I'm looking for any advice to either:
1) Resolve bootloader issue (if it is an issue) and restore stock roms and OTA back to a clean build; or 2) Fix my rooted phone to restore wifi, AND THEN find a workaround for Good for Enterprise (RootCloak and Xposed Installer tools did not help me in this aspect)
I have done all I can do by scrounging on the internet without asking any questions, but as most threads have been abandoned almost two years ago, I really just needed some help.
Any help will be much obliged.
submitted by seldomsimple to GalaxyS3 [link] [comments]

Question about geohot's s5 root from a noobie

So I ran geohot's new s5 root on my s3 running 4.3 and it worked. So now I'm rooted (Sweeet!).
First question is, what does one do to fully unroot the phone?
Being a noob at this whole root thing, I'm told I need a superuser app to help with security, so I downloaded superSU and when prompted to update the binary file it reboots and fails to install. It will reboot in recovery with a few options but I'm not sure what they mean.
So does a SU app just not let any random application write/rewrite stuff to the /systemfile? I'm just trying to get my head around how it all works in the phone for this root method.
I know there a lot of people with some good knowledge of rooting on here so thought I'd ask for some guidance.
PS: I got xposed framework installed and tried for a few aesthetic mods, and upon changing those, it made me install an app called Busy box? What is this for?
Thanks in advance for any help! (on my phone for sorry for shit format)
submitted by Mr_Braaap to AndroidQuestions [link] [comments]

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